What is ECP Therapy?

Clinical Studies

Increases in Cardiac Output and Oxygen Consumption During External Counterpulsation

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Enhanced External Counterpulsation Is an Effective Treatment for Depression in Patients With Refractory Angina Pectoris

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External Counterpulsation decreases advanced glycation end products and proinflammatory cytokines in patients with non-insulin-dependent type II diabetes mellitus for up to 6 months following treatment

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External Counterpulsation in patients with refractory angina pectoris: A pilot study with six months follow-up regarding physical capacity and health-related quality of life

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External Counterpulsation Therapy: Past, Present, and Future

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ECP THERAPY

For the 1st Time in the UAE at the Sharjah Research, Technology & Innovation Park

              
            

Ultimate Preventive Health Maintenance Tool

  • Boosts Anti-Oxidant Production
  • Flushes Metabolic Waste & Increases Immune System Response
  • Reduces Stress, Anxiety & Depression
  • Promotes Deep & Restful Sleep

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A Powerful Anti-Aging Tool

  • Improves Complexion & Decreases Inflammation
  • Improves Microvascular Circulation
  • Increases Nitric Oxide Production
  • Reverse Effects of Blood Vessel Aging

Excellent Sports Recovery Therapy

  • Increase Energy Levels & Improve Cardiovascular Fitness
  • Reduce Fatigue & Lactic Acid Build-up
  • Naturally Enhance Endurance & Stamina
  • Decrease in Recovery Time Between Workouts
  • Reduce Risk of Injury

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Bring Back the Quality of Life You Deserve

  • Reverses the Effects of Heart Disease Strengthens Heart & Cardiovascular System
  • Increases Collateral Circulation & Creates Natural 'Bypasses'
  • Increases Energy & Endurance
  • Lessens Muscle Stiffness & Increases Flexiblity
  • Improves Organ Function & Blood Flow to the Brain

What is ECP?

“External Counterpulsation (ECP) Therapy is a non-invasive, compression therapy, clinically proven to boost blood circulation to keep your heart and organs in optimum health.”

HOW DOES ECP WORK?


Chest pain? Shortness of breath? Dizziness or headaches? The problem could be poor blood flow.

Our heart and circulatory system are designed to transport oxygen and nutrients to every cell in the body, as well as filter out waste and carbon dioxide. Good blood flow is essential to good health, and has a positive effect on your mind and body.

Poor blood circulation greatly increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). This occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries. As plaque builds up, it blocks and reduces the amount of blood flowing through. When this restricts blood flow to the heart muscle, it can cause chest pain, also known as angina. Angina can make it difficult to enjoy one's favourite activities, or even perform simple daily tasks.

In severe cases, plaque can block entire blood vessels. When blockage happens in the vessels supplying blood to the heart muscle or brain, it can lead to a heart attack and a stroke respectively.


What is ECP Therapy and how does it enhance blood flow?

ECP Therapy is a safe and non-invasive process that increases blood circulation and is used for the treatment of chronic stable angina. It enhances blood flow by pushing blood from the lower body toward the heart.

Pressure cuffs are wrapped around your lower body while you lay comfortably. These cuffs inflate when your heart is at rest and deflate right before your heart pumps. Due to the precise synchronisation with your heartbeat, ECP therapy has been described as a ‘second heart’ that allows your heart to perform with less effort.

The therapy is soothing and relaxing, much like a lower body massage. Many people listen to music, watch TV or simply rest during a therapy session.

To find out more on how ECP therapy works, click here.



How can you benefit from ECP Therapy?

After completing a course of ECP treatment, patients have shown7:

A reduction in angina symptoms: shortness of breath, dizziness, fatigue, weakness, pain or pressure in the chest, back, neck, jaw, shoulders or arms

  • A reduction in nitroglycerin medication use
  • An increase in energy and exercise tolerance
  • An overall improvement in quality of life
  • Benefits that can last for years after treatment


Have a Question? Get in Touch!

Team Merlin is here to answer any questions you may have about receiving ECP Therapy or guide you through the best tailored solution for your business.

Contact US
References
  • 1)Braith RW, et al. Enhanced external counterpulsation improves peripheral artery flow-mediated dilation in patients with chronic angina: a randomized sham-controlled study. Circulation. 2010;122:1612-20.
  • 2)Arora RR, et al. Effects of Enhanced External Counterpulsation on Health-Related Quality of Life Continue 12 Months After Treatment: A Substudy of the Multicenter Study of Enhanced External Counterpulsation. Journal of Investigative Medicine. 2002; 50:25-32.
  • 3)Loh, et al. Enhanced External Counterpulsation in the Treatment of Chronic Refractory Angina: A Long-term Follow-up Outcome from the International Enhanced External Counterpulsation Patient Registry. Clin Cardiol. 2008;31:159-164.
  • 4)Cai D, Wu R, Shao Y. Experimental study of the effect of external counterpulsation on blood circulation in the lower extremities. Clinical and investigative medicine Medecine clinique et experimentale. 2000;23(4):239-47.
  • 5)Gurovich AN, Braith RW. Enhanced external counterpulsation creates acute blood flow patterns responsible for improved flow-mediated dilation in humans. Hypertension research : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension. 2013;36(4):297-305.
  • 6)Bonetti PO, Holmes DR, Lerman A, Barsness GW, Jr., Enhanced external counterpulsation for ischemic heart disease: what's behind the curtain? .J Am Coll Cardiol. 2003;41:1918–1925).
  • 7)Loh PH, Cleland JGF, Louis AA, et al. Enhanced external counterpulsation in the treatment of chronic refractory angina: A long-term follow-up outcome from the international enhanced external counterpulsation patient registry. Clin Cardiol. 2008;31:159-164